A tour of Harvey

There is a little area called Harvey ( see map here ) just before you get to the marsh before Riverside-Albert on Route 915.  I love this area for its scenery and historic properties. We stopped in the other day to visit with the owners of Florentine Manor who have their property up for sale if anyone is in the market for a beautiful Inn. Mark and I stayed here for our anniversary about 14 years ago.  It is like stepping back in time when you walk in to this impressive Inn that was originally a residence built in the 1870s.  Mary Tingley and her husband Cyril have owned it since 1976 and have run it is an Inn since 1983. Mary grew up in these parts and has been working in the hospitality industry for 51 years between their Inn and a store across the street at Harvey Corner. We loved getting to know some history about the place and her involvement in it. She allowed us to take a few photos the afternoon we visited. You can find out more about the Inn on their webpage here. I wish I was in the market for an Inn- it sounds romantic but I’m sure it is lots of work and sacrifice.

There is another Bed and Breakfast as you turn off route 915 onto Mary’s Point Road. This is the road that takes you on a lovely scenic loop back to route 915 a few kilometres up the road.  This B and B is called Sandpiper’s Rest B and B which looks like a very comfortable place to stay as well. You can find their website here.

As we travel down the road we pass the old Harvey Hall and First Harvey Baptist Church. Continuing on we reach the Shepody Dam and the Anderson Hollow lighthouse that was moved here from a wharf on Waterside beach  many years ago.  There is a little green space here for admiring the view. We used to take the kids here to play on the replica ship and have a picnic. I couldn’t find a picnic table last time we drove by and the replica ship seemed to be falling into the river. I’m not sure who is responsible for the upkeep of this adorable space but hopefully it will stay as a place for visitors and residents to enjoy.  Mark took the most beautiful photos here one day a few years ago. He actually shared this one of the lighthouse in his guest post here.

Just a little ways down the road past some more historic properties we reach Studio on the Marsh– an art gallery dedicated to the works of Lars Larsen and continues to be run by his wife Michelle. She also features other local artists and photographers. We love browsing her studio and picking up a print here and there. We love stopping in during the Christmas open house when she has various discounts going on as well. Check out their Facebook page to see  an event happening on Aug 18th from 3-7 pm where you can meet wildlife artist and photographer Jacqueline Verge .

 

We are almost done our tour!  It ends at the beautiful area called Mary’s Point.We have enjoyed many afternoons and picnics at Mary’s Point over the years with our kids and family. I wondered if it was named after Mary Majka who lived there and  who had a lot to do with preserving this piece of land and the wildlife that visits it. There are numerous credits to Mary’s name throughout the last 50 years including organizations she has founded but alas, it was not named after her. I found this article about her in a Globe and Mail piece and local author Deborah Carr has written a book about her called Sanctuary. Canadian Wildlife Services is working toward getting a new interpretive centre and program going to highlight the area.  A new building is up at the site and we got to enjoy a couple evenings listening to interpreter Denis Doucet’s explanation of the migration of shore birds and lots about nature as well. He is a wealth of information! I will be visiting even more once the new centre is open. They are hoping for a soft opening ( not everything running) maybe this fall. Stay tuned for that! We have so many photos from here but here are a few we picked for this post:

This week will mark 6 months of blogging. I love sharing what we are doing or what I find inspiring in hopes of inspiring you as well. I still have lots to learn. Here’s to the next 6 months! If there is anything you would like to see or learn about let me know!

Thanks for travelling with us on The Road to Waterside!

 

 

A man and his camera

I have a very special guest for this week’s post in honour of Father’s Day. He is a special man in my life and the life of my kids. He is an awesome photographer, has a great sense of humour, is patient , kind and very generous. He has even developed some mean building skills in the past few years that have enhanced our cottage and saved us money. Without further ado, I introduce you to my better half , the one who makes me smile everyday and supports me in all I do. He is my partner in life, husband and father of my children- Mark Nicolle!

I feel honoured to be asked to contribute to this wonderful blog about the Road to Waterside.  Thank you Sheila for asking if I would contribute today’s post and share some of my favourite photos of the area !  

 

My father instilled in me a love for the outdoors with many fishing, hunting, camping trips, very often along the Fundy coast region.  That love of the outdoors brought me continually to the Waterside and Fundy National Park region. By the time I could drive I was ‘down country’ more weekends than I wasn’t during the summers. I first met Sheila about 28 years ago around this time of year. On one of those ‘first dates’ we travelled the Road to Waterside on our way to Fundy National Park.  We have travelled that road multitudes of times since then, and Lord willing many more times to come. I have been so blessed to be able to share my love of this region all over again through sharing it with our 2 children as they have grown up.  

 

Through all of my relationship with Sheila and during our years of raising our children I have also had a passion for photography.  34 years ago I put down my lawn mowing money at a pawn shop and picked up my first ‘real’ camera. A few years after that I got a job in a camera shop that provided employment through high school, university, and for awhile after that.  I have always enjoyed being able to ‘create’ images and to share things I have seen, thus the name of my photo web site www.marksawthis.com  . I love to create images that are visually pleasing, but more than that, I like creating a visual journal.  I do want to create an interesting image. An image that would share the beauty or interest that I am trying to capture.  But what I believe we all love the most about our images is that memory, that feeling, that moment of our lives that a photograph can return us to.

 

With that in mind I want to share with you 13 images I have taken along the Road to Waterside.  Images that are a journal of years of driving to a place I love , with people I love.


This is Anderson Lighthouse.  It used to sit on a wharf at Waterside beach which has long since washed away.  It now sits in Harvey at one end of the Shepody Dam Road. I love the image because the light was so eerie and soft, and the sky was so interesting.  I have memories from the 1980s cutting across this dirt road on my way to my friend Chris’s Camp which was on Route 915.


Many will recognize Dickson Falls in Fundy National Park.  I have more photos of Dickson Falls than any man should. This is one of my Favorites. I could probably dig out some film photos from before there were stairs and boardwalks at the base of the falls. Do you have photos of Dickson Falls in your collection ?

Owl’s Head is certainly one of the most recognizable geological features you see from Fundy National Park.  The way it often catches and forces the Bay of Fundy fog upwards can look quite spectacular. This day had just the right amount of fog to be interesting to me.  The crows in the foreground make this image one I have favourited. There are not many birds more common as the crow around these parts. But I’ve often thought of creating a collection of interesting crow photos.


This is probably my favorite photo of a deer / fawn.  It was at Point Wolfe. Park staff had ‘flagged’ the path for the ‘Ship Haven Trail’ that was to be built the next year, so I thought I would get a sneak peek at the vistas it would offer. The sun was low, streaking through the tall trees.  A doe had just walked over the ridge in front of me and I felt disappointed I had missed the opportunity to get a photo of it. Then behind her came this fawn. The first shutter release piqued her ear , and afforded this pose for my second.  It was such a beautiful moment I almost didn’t care if the photo came out OK or not. It was such a memorable moment. Of course I did care that later when I developed the photos, I had an image that would be a favourite for the years to come.


I’m being verbose, I’ll babble less.  This is Long Marsh Creek on Route 915 at the bridge where you turn off to the Cape Enrage Road.  The timing made this image, ‘slack water’ that short time when there is very little movement in a tidal stream, sunset, freshly fallen snow. All these happened at the same time, and at the time I was driving past.

 Cape Enrage lighthouse.  How many have visited here before they restored the lighthouse keepers home, before the fences, before the gate and entrance fees ?  This was the early rays of light bathing the cape in late fall.

Above from many moons ago,  is my daughter during a visit to Mary’s Point.  I like so many things about this image, mostly that it brings back the memory of a beautiful evening with my family. Below are our kids sauntering along the Dickson Falls trail in Fundy National Park.  

Don’t like the weather ?  Wait a few minutes and it will change.  I have the feeling this saying is not unique to just the maritimes.  But I do like the next 3 images and how they clearly show just how much impact the weather can have on how a place looks. I specifically like how Matthew’s Head in the distance just disappears completely by the third image.  I like the drama in the sky in the first , the softness of the light in the second, and the highlights of the sun hitting the fog in the third These were taken from the driveway in Waterside. There’s a lesson somewhere in the fact that unsettled weather is what made these images valuable to me.


This image was sunrise at Redhead, before the latest bit of erosion removed some more of it.  Yet another lesson for me to ‘seize the day’ , and to do things while you can.

I’ll end with a simple silhouette of the Great Blue Heron.  For Sheila and I the great blue heron has come to represent our special place in Waterside.  For years we have enjoyed watching them and we still feel a special awe when we see them gliding overhead to the marsh, standing motionless as they fish, or preening in the sun as they are perched along the treeline.

Thank you for tagging along this photo journey on the Road to Waterside.  I hope you have many photos from the road trips that have meant so much to you in your lives.  Take some time this week to dig them out and let them bring you back to the days when you captured them. Let us know about your favourite road trips.

Thank you so much Mark, that was beautiful. I love it all and you!  Happy Father’s Day.

As a special thank you for following along and promoting our page and blog, we are giving away an 8 x 10 of any image you see on this post or on Mark’s website. We will do a random draw from any shares,likes and comments on this post or on our Facebook page “The Road to Waterside”. Draw will be made on Father’s Day!