Acadian History- 2019

This summer is of special significance to the Acadian population. You may have seen a little news about it lately! It is the World Acadian Congress, being hosted in PEI and Southeastern NB from Aug 10th- 24th. This congress takes place every 5 years to strengthen and celebrate the ties of various Acadian Communities and for people who are interested and have a love for Acadia. Acadian history certainly runs strong in this area of the world. Did you know there is a strong connection  down route 114 to a lady who owns the Maple Grove Inn with her husband in Riverside- Albert. She is the great-great-great granddaughter of Pierre Thibodeau who helped settle the area known as Shepody or Chipoudie.

Here is a little more info found on the Acadian.org website from the Acadian historical timeline in 1698 when Pierre Thibodeau came to Shepody:

“1698
Much like the Beaubassin area (but 25 years later), Pierre Thibodeau let settlers to settle at Shepody (Chipoudy) in 1698. He had been a miller at Pre Ronde at Port Royal. He and his sons went to the Shepody area and encouraged friends (Blanchards) to settle the Petitcodiac. Three of Thibodeau’s sons first wintered the area in 1699/1700. They did very well at trading furs with Indians. Sebastien de Villieu objected, saying they were on his father-in-law’s seigneurie without permission. Pierre wanted to compromise, but de Villieu didn’t. When de Villieu was ready to deal in 1702, Pierre’s group refused because they had sent a petition to France and thought they’d get their own seigneurie. In 1705, the decision was made that is was only a concession to La Villiere’s seigneurie.
There were 7 families (33 people) at Shepody in 1702, and 5 families (13 people) at Petitcodiac. By 1707, there were about 55 people (14 families and 7 engages), 12 horses, 70 cattle, and 50 sheep. The outbreak of war and de Villieu’s actions put a damper on further settlement of the area. It wasn’t raided, but English ships blocked any goods from coming from Port Royal. Rameau estimated 75 people there in 1715 (but 80% of European blood). One of Thibodeau’s group, his son-in-law Mathieu Des Goutins, was the 2nd and last chief civil officer, or king’s clerk, in Acadia. He became procureur general in 1693, similar (but on a lower level) to Canada’s intendants. He served after Gargas from 1688 to 1710. [Clark, p. 145]
A census was taken in 1698 of Port Royal, Beaubassin, and the St. Jean River areas. The 1698 census includes the names and ages of all family members, as well as a count of livestock, land, and munitions.”

Of special significance is an event happening this Friday, Aug 16th @ 10:30 am in Riverside-Albert with various dignitaries and families representing the Acadian families who settled in Shepody and surrounding area. There will be an official unveiling and address following by Frank McKenna of the Monument that has been erected in honor of the Acadian familiies who settled in the region between 1700 and 1755. You can see the full program for the event at this website.  The event will take place in the park just beside 5702 King St. in Riverside-Albert. Pierre Thibodeau’s great,great,great granddaughter Sonya will also be participating. There will be a social celebration following the ceremony at the exhibition grounds in Riverside-Albert.

This has been a joint effort between the mayor of Riverside-Albert and Wilfred Savoie along with their committees  to have this monument erected. They have been working on it for the past 3 years. Here are the official press releases about the event in French and English.

What a wonderful way to honour some of the founding families who helped clear and settle this great area. You may recognize some of the names like Thibodeau, Boudreau and Comeau or you may even be related to them!  If you want more information about how this event came to be and more details about it , head to their website www.monumentdechipoudie.ca.   We are heading to Newfoundland this week so we won’t be able to attend. I look forward to hearing reports about it. Have a wonderful event! See you on the Road to Waterside or Newfoundland!

For the love of Grindstone

 When I wrote about the new Shorebird Discovery Centre at Mary’s Point and the view of Grindstone Island you can see from the new trail there it reminded me that I hadn’t featured Grindstone Island on the blog yet. The Friends of Grindstone Island is a  group of volunteers that was first started by Kelly-Sue O’Connor in 2015.  I have the great pleasure of introducing Melanie Shaw as our guest this week. She is the current Lead Steward of The Friends of Grindstone Island. With Melanie’s involvement with the Island and her attachment to the area I knew she could do a better feature on it than I could. The first photo is by my husband Mark looking at Grindstone Island from up the hill behind Broadleaf Farm, It gives you an idea of it from far away of where it sits out there in the Bay of Fundy across from the Harvey banks. The rest of the photos are from Melanie from some of her visits to the Island. Read on to hear more about this magical place and how you can be involved in helping to preserve it. There is a special treat at the bottom of the post to enjoy at your leisure. 

 

 

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Clam diggin’

That title is a little deceiving. We didn’t actually go clam digging but we were diggin’ clams. I had a hankering for clam chowder a couple weeks ago and remembered seeing a recipe for it in the Fiddleheads, Fricot and Frittata cookbook compiled by Janet Wallace for the Canada 150 Albert County Museum project. She graciously let me share these 2 recipes with you all. 

This first one is your classic creamy clam chowder. It was so easy and tasty. There is no amount listed for the milk/cream. I made mine a little too thin so add milk/cream slowly until you get the thickness you like for a chowder.

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Mary’s Point 2.0

Exciting news for locals and tourists alike, especially all you bird watchers!  If you were down to Mary’s Point last summer, you would have noticed a new building that was erected beside the old interpretive building. This new Shorebird Discovery Centre is beautifully situated to take in the expanse that is the Shepody Natural Wildlife Area (NWA). The Shepody NWA includes Mary’s Point, New Horton and Germantown Marsh. We were excited to see it and even more excited to hear it would be opening in 2019.  We headed down there this past weekend and was pleased to see one of the interpreter’s we had met last year,  Denis Doucet,  and his team settling in to the centre and getting ready for the grand opening which is happening July 16th at 1 pm.

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Foods of Fundy

Are you getting spring fever yet?  I feel a definite change in the air and temperature in the past week. A sure sign of spring the past couple of years is when Foods of the Fundy Valley hosts their Seedy Saturday event. It is an event that gets everyone in the mood for looking at or finding the perfect seeds for that perfect flower or vegetable they want to grow. “This free event includes seed sellers, garden related local businesses and organizations and a seed swap table along with workshops throughout the day”. We were able to get down to it this past Saturday and also attended last year when it was in the high school in Hillsborough. You can see my post here from last year– I featured Farmer Brown who was back again this year for another workshop and plant offerings. This year it was held in the old Baptist Church that houses Oliver’s German Bakery – featured here– and is the site of the Hillsborough Farmer’s market in the summer. Cochrane Family Farms was  back as well as Rainbow Seeds, Fundy Farms, Mapple Farms and many others. There were also a few crafters and artisans. I got to meet Jim and Ruth -Ann who create pottery from Fundy mud ( Jim’s art-find his site here) and beautiful linocut prints ( Ruth- Ann – has a lovely site here ), You can usually find their smiling faces and booth at the weekly Farmer’s Market or you might spy their work in some of the shops along the Road to Waterside!

One the things people look forward to is the fabulous soup bar put on by the Foods of the Fundy Valley as well. You can see there was a great turn out this year with lots of people enjoying the fares and wares.

This was one of the many workshops people could attend throughout the day- another highlight!

Lastly I want to give a shout out to Foods of the Fundy Valley who not only offer this event for free but also do so much more in the community.”They incorporated in October 2010 as a non-profit corporation whose mission is to foster an environment that promotes the production and consumption of local foods and local goods in the Albert County Area .” They support and run the Hillsborough Farmer’s Market, the Community Food Smart program, and the Community Garden at Forestdale Nursing Home  They also offer workshops throughout the year at a nominal or volunary costs, They support educational programs at some of the local schools. They also have a beautiful logo that identifies businesses who are using locally grown or made products. Make sure you look for it and support our local producers and businesses! You can find out more about their various programs on their website and also become a member if you are passionate about food and community for only $5 per year.

I wish you many happy planting dreams as we look forward to the next few weeks as we start to see new life starting to bloom.

The Art of Glass

What a pleasure it is feature this next business and artist to you.  When asked how he would describe what he does, Curtis Dionne identifies himself as an artist first. He has been honing his skill of blown glass for the last 15+ years including the 5 years he spent as an apprentice learning and practising his trade out west. Curtis has lived all over Canada but has settled with his partner Charlotte and kids in the beautiful Albert County countryside by the coast in New Horton. It is fitting that Curtis’ property borders one of the Nature Conservancy sites we featured last week on the blog at Two Rivers. This is where his studio shop is located which houses the handmade furnace he built brick by brick over a 3 year span.

If you travel down the 915, you will find Curtis’  property with a unique building on it that you can see from this photo. It is called an octahedrone.

Source- Facebook

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Nurturing Nature

We had the pleasure of getting down for the Lands and Trails meeting in Riverside-Albert Tuesday night hosted by the Southeast Regional Service Commission, the Nature Conservancy of Canada, and the Fundy Biosphere Reserve.  This is a follow-up to the post I wrote just a couple weeks ago about the plans for a 150 km trail from Fundy park to Shediac that I heard about from Marc Leger, the Trails coordinator for the Southeast Regional Service Commission during Riverview’s Winter Carnival. The meeting this week was an opportunity to hear more about how all the “Nature” organizations can work together conserving, protecting and using the land in a sustainable, enjoyable way in concert with development and marketing of this new Trail. 

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Cinnamon Soul Cafe

Hi everyone!  This is my first post of year two. Wow, thank you to all those who entered our one year giveaway. I will try to do more of those over the coming months. You can always subscribe to my mailing list anytime to get more personalized information, photos and behind the scenes updates of what is going on at The Road to Waterside .

We ventured down the road again this past weekend to this cute spot:

Nestled on the side of the road and sometimes behind a sunflower jungle, you will find the sweet Cinnamon Soul Cafe on Main St in Hillsborough. We have stopped in here once before for a meal and a few times for coffee and one of their famous cinnamon rolls. I wanted to check them out again for the blog and introduce you to them.  What a better time to visit than for a Valentine’s date.  We stopped by on Friday evening last week right after work. It was a great time to go because we wanted to skip the crowd that was sure to hit during the Albert County Winter Carnival!

Image may contain: sky and outdoor

(photo from their Facebook page)

The first thing that strikes you about the Cafe is the pop of colour on the red roof outside. They updated the outside a few years ago. It makes a striking view from the road. Great curb appeal! Then there are the blues you encounter from the outside to the inside. It is very welcoming and calming inside with the hints of coastal blues, wooden beams and planked ceilings. The cafe also serves as an art gallery for the owner Heather’s hand thrown pottery. I got to browse a little while we waited for our meal.

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Happy trails!

Do you know where to find Tweedle Dee and Tweedle Dum Falls? Have you heard of the Dragon’s Tooth? These are just 2 of the 50 Amazing places you can find to explore around the Fundy Biosphere Reserve. “As a non-profit organization, the Fundy Biosphere Reserve is a community-based initiative comprised of individuals and representatives of various stakeholder groups, organizations and local communities working to promote the sustainable development of the region by enhancing the research and innovation capacity and by creating a forum for various groups to share information, knowledge and best practices.” The UNESCO-designated biosphere comprises  442,250 hectares in the upper Bay of Fundy coast, stretching from St. Martins to the Tantramar Marsh near Sackville and inland to Moncton. As Dr. Jennifer Dingman, the Executive Director of the Fundy Biosphere Reserve, explained in part of the talk at the Riverview Winter Carnival this past weekend “Engage with Nature”- it is all the watershed that falls into the upper Bay of Fundy area including the Petitcodiac and the other little estuaries that contribute to the Bay.  This biosphere is unique and was nominated by the planning committee to be a UNESCO site back in 2007 ,after 8 years of planning ,because of these 3 reasons:

  • Recognition of a special piece of the Atlantic Canada maritime landscape and the uniqueness of the Bay of Fundy;
  • Recognition of the area’s history and its cultural identity in the region and within Canada;
  • Recognition of the past and continued commitment of residents, policy makers, resource sectors and scientists to seek continued improvement in intergenerational sustainability.

It was the hope that being designated as a UNESCO site would also bring local and international investment and interest to the area. At this time many organizations we heard from at the workshop are hoping that the Tourism department will see this designated site as a worthwhile investment for our province to engage people to visit our province. There are 18 designated areas in Canada with 3 right here in Atlantic Canada- 1 in New Brunswick with the Fundy Biosphere and 2 in Nova Scotia.

The Fundy Biosphere Reserve designated 50 Amazing Places to explore ,that are found along many already established trails and destination spots. The 2 places I mentioned above were ones I had never heard of so I had to look them up!  Wouldn’t you know they are on the most strenuous trail in the area- the Fundy Footpath. Have any of you hiked this strenuous trail?  Don’t be discouraged if you’ve heard how daunting it is! There are many other beautiful accessible sites like Dickson Falls in Fundy Park or Cape Enrage and of course our beautiful Waterside and Dennis beach made the list!  You can see the whole map on the Fundy Biosphere’s website along with videos and articles about some of the areas.

I encourage you to look them up and tell me how many you have been to! If you don’t know where some of them are or how to get there- check out Hiking New Brunswick’s website– a great resource for all trails in New Brunswick. Here are some photos of some of the places we’ve been on the list:

Hopewell Rocks in Hopewell Cape.

Mary’s point in Harvey.

Squaw’s Cap Look-off on the Coastal Trail in Fundy.

Dickson Falls in Fundy.

Herring Cove Beach in Fundy. 

Sea Caves in St. Martin’s.

Speaking of trails, we also had the pleasure of hearing from Marc Leger, the new Regional Trails Coordinator for the Southeast Regional Service Commission. Marc has a long history with trail making with his Dad Alonzo on the Fundy Footpath and Dobson Trail. He gave us some interesting insights about trails that I had never thought of. Not only are trails great for connecting us to nature, relieving stress, and helping us stay fit  they also connect people, communities, culture and businesses. Using the example from the Trail Town program of the Buddha Bear Cafe in Riverview, he showed how a trail can get people in touch and investing in small business right off the trail and making a huge difference in communities when the trails are accessible and easy to use. According the Trail Town philosophy , a trail is successful if they have the following qualities: 1) It creates economic growth, 2) Grows local business and creates jobs, 3) Compounds the trail’s economic potential, 4) Improves infrastructure in rural areas, and 5) Protects the trails and surrounding nature. Buddha Bear Cafe is right on the Riverfront Trail facing the Petitcodiac river. It is easy access for people to stop for a drink or bite to eat while they are also using trail. I know they have even had events where people come for a drink while watching our famous Tidal Bore. This kind of use of trails attracts locals and tourists alike to invest in our small businesses and communities!

I was excited to hear about the most recent project Marc is working on. I had heard rumours about it lately but Marc confirmed the rumours are true! He is working on a huge project called The Shore-Line trail. It is a proposal to join Alma to Shediac via a 150 km trail. It would connect the provinces 3 largest attractions- Fundy National Park, Hopewell Rocks and Parlee Beach – as well as all the attractions along the way. Here is a little description of the trail from their proposal : The Shore-Line could be almost entirely off-road and will utilize abandoned rail corridors, dykes, undeveloped Department of Transportation and Infrastructure corridors and Crown Land wherever possible. Every possible effort will be made to locate a route that will follow coastline and waterways because trails users generally prefer trails to be close to water.  Isn’t that awesome!  How many have cringed when they hit the 114 outside Riverview? The narrow road with no margins makes us nervous in our cars let alone ever trying to walk, run or bike there. If you have been following my blog since last year, you remember the story of meeting a lady from Alberta who biked all the way to Newfoundland. She said the stretch from Hopewell Cape to Moncton was one of the scariest stretches she had driven in her whole drive across the country ( Thankfully she did get picked up for that stretch and didn’t have to drive it). It would be wonderful to have a trail that is safe, accessible and easy to manage for the average person. 

For those who are interested in this trail or anyone who lives along this route, there is a meeting Feb 26th at the Riverside- Albert Recreation Centre with a drop in from 1-4 and information meeting from 6:30-8:30.  Representatives from The Fundy Biosphere Reserve, Nature Conservancy of Canada and Regional Service Commission will be there for the presentations. 

The last person we heard from at the workshop was Sarah Lord. Sarah has been the wellness coordinator at Jean Coutu in Riverview for the past 10 years. She has a passion for helping people get active and lead healthier lives. She has led various groups for walking, nordic walking, hiking, snowshoeing, etc. She has started her own business to lead people on tours and hikes especially if you are nervous about going alone. You can find her on her Facebook page Maritime Detours for all her latest news.

I had such a great time meeting some new people in the world of outdoor trails and pursuits. Other honourable mentions I heard were the Outdoor Enthusiasts Club and the Women of the Wilderness if you are looking for groups to join- they are on Facebook as well. 

Next week will be 1 year in the blogging world. It has been fun to share places, businesses and creativity along the Road to Waterside. Be sure to tune in next week for a chance to win a Valentine’s basket to thank you for all your support!!

Fundy for all seasons

Just when you think you can’t take the weather and the roads anywhere, you take a break in the weather and head to Fundy. What Mark and I found this weekend was a renewed hope for enjoying more of winter. Since the kids have gotten older and my hands have gotten worse in the cold with Raynaud’s disease, we really have gotten away from doing anything outside in the winter. This past weekend though was gorgeous and tolerable! I could actually see myself enjoying it (when the temperature and wind were just right 🙂 ).  We wanted to show you this week all the ways Fundy is making it more inviting to enjoy the park in all seasons. Enjoy some of these photos Mark took while we explored all the options available to you.

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