Acadian History- 2019

This summer is of special significance to the Acadian population. You may have seen a little news about it lately! It is the World Acadian Congress, being hosted in PEI and Southeastern NB from Aug 10th- 24th. This congress takes place every 5 years to strengthen and celebrate the ties of various Acadian Communities and for people who are interested and have a love for Acadia. Acadian history certainly runs strong in this area of the world. Did you know there is a strong connection  down route 114 to a lady who owns the Maple Grove Inn with her husband in Riverside- Albert. She is the great-great-great granddaughter of Pierre Thibodeau who helped settle the area known as Shepody or Chipoudie.

Here is a little more info found on the Acadian.org website from the Acadian historical timeline in 1698 when Pierre Thibodeau came to Shepody:

“1698
Much like the Beaubassin area (but 25 years later), Pierre Thibodeau let settlers to settle at Shepody (Chipoudy) in 1698. He had been a miller at Pre Ronde at Port Royal. He and his sons went to the Shepody area and encouraged friends (Blanchards) to settle the Petitcodiac. Three of Thibodeau’s sons first wintered the area in 1699/1700. They did very well at trading furs with Indians. Sebastien de Villieu objected, saying they were on his father-in-law’s seigneurie without permission. Pierre wanted to compromise, but de Villieu didn’t. When de Villieu was ready to deal in 1702, Pierre’s group refused because they had sent a petition to France and thought they’d get their own seigneurie. In 1705, the decision was made that is was only a concession to La Villiere’s seigneurie.
There were 7 families (33 people) at Shepody in 1702, and 5 families (13 people) at Petitcodiac. By 1707, there were about 55 people (14 families and 7 engages), 12 horses, 70 cattle, and 50 sheep. The outbreak of war and de Villieu’s actions put a damper on further settlement of the area. It wasn’t raided, but English ships blocked any goods from coming from Port Royal. Rameau estimated 75 people there in 1715 (but 80% of European blood). One of Thibodeau’s group, his son-in-law Mathieu Des Goutins, was the 2nd and last chief civil officer, or king’s clerk, in Acadia. He became procureur general in 1693, similar (but on a lower level) to Canada’s intendants. He served after Gargas from 1688 to 1710. [Clark, p. 145]
A census was taken in 1698 of Port Royal, Beaubassin, and the St. Jean River areas. The 1698 census includes the names and ages of all family members, as well as a count of livestock, land, and munitions.”

Of special significance is an event happening this Friday, Aug 16th @ 10:30 am in Riverside-Albert with various dignitaries and families representing the Acadian families who settled in Shepody and surrounding area. There will be an official unveiling and address following by Frank McKenna of the Monument that has been erected in honor of the Acadian familiies who settled in the region between 1700 and 1755. You can see the full program for the event at this website.  The event will take place in the park just beside 5702 King St. in Riverside-Albert. Pierre Thibodeau’s great,great,great granddaughter Sonya will also be participating. There will be a social celebration following the ceremony at the exhibition grounds in Riverside-Albert.

This has been a joint effort between the mayor of Riverside-Albert and Wilfred Savoie along with their committees  to have this monument erected. They have been working on it for the past 3 years. Here are the official press releases about the event in French and English.

What a wonderful way to honour some of the founding families who helped clear and settle this great area. You may recognize some of the names like Thibodeau, Boudreau and Comeau or you may even be related to them!  If you want more information about how this event came to be and more details about it , head to their website www.monumentdechipoudie.ca.   We are heading to Newfoundland this week so we won’t be able to attend. I look forward to hearing reports about it. Have a wonderful event! See you on the Road to Waterside or Newfoundland!

For the love of Grindstone

 When I wrote about the new Shorebird Discovery Centre at Mary’s Point and the view of Grindstone Island you can see from the new trail there it reminded me that I hadn’t featured Grindstone Island on the blog yet. The Friends of Grindstone Island is a  group of volunteers that was first started by Kelly-Sue O’Connor in 2015.  I have the great pleasure of introducing Melanie Shaw as our guest this week. She is the current Lead Steward of The Friends of Grindstone Island. With Melanie’s involvement with the Island and her attachment to the area I knew she could do a better feature on it than I could. The first photo is by my husband Mark looking at Grindstone Island from up the hill behind Broadleaf Farm, It gives you an idea of it from far away of where it sits out there in the Bay of Fundy across from the Harvey banks. The rest of the photos are from Melanie from some of her visits to the Island. Read on to hear more about this magical place and how you can be involved in helping to preserve it. There is a special treat at the bottom of the post to enjoy at your leisure. 

 

 

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