Time to explore

Our recent trip to Newfoundland has me inspired to look for some of the less advertised and/or marked trails in our neck of the coast. Some of our more memorable moments and beautiful scenery was found on some of the community maintained paths that we found in the areas we visited. The first three here were not even trails we were looking for but because we had some time to explore and because they weren’t too long, they were just right for our family. It was fun to see new places and not be too worn out doing it! Because this trip is so fresh in our minds, I hope you don’t mind if I indulge in documenting some of these trails to inspire you to maybe look for trails in your area that maybe only the locals know about !

The first place we loved was at Bottle Cove in Lark Harbour.  There were trails here maintained by OBIEC (Outer Bay of Islands Enhancement Committee). These are panoramic photos Mark took of the “Bottle Cove” . The second photo is showing what we saw when we hiked out the furthest point you see on the right side of the cove.

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Outdoor Tour Part 3

Good Wednesday evening! As you read this post, we are fully immersed in Newfoundland lore and culture. We came over on the 13th and are staying until the 25th. You know we will have to show you that beautiful land in the future. If you follow my Facebook page and/or Instagram page, I’ve been trying to post something I’ve loved about Newfoundland everyday. In anticipation of being away, I thought I would share the last installment of our outdoor changes that we completed this summer. As a reminder, this is how the cottage looked right after construction in 2013:

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Acadian History- 2019

This summer is of special significance to the Acadian population. You may have seen a little news about it lately! It is the World Acadian Congress, being hosted in PEI and Southeastern NB from Aug 10th- 24th. This congress takes place every 5 years to strengthen and celebrate the ties of various Acadian Communities and for people who are interested and have a love for Acadia. Acadian history certainly runs strong in this area of the world. Did you know there is a strong connection  down route 114 to a lady who owns the Maple Grove Inn with her husband in Riverside- Albert. She is the great-great-great granddaughter of Pierre Thibodeau who helped settle the area known as Shepody or Chipoudie.

Here is a little more info found on the Acadian.org website from the Acadian historical timeline in 1698 when Pierre Thibodeau came to Shepody:

“1698
Much like the Beaubassin area (but 25 years later), Pierre Thibodeau let settlers to settle at Shepody (Chipoudy) in 1698. He had been a miller at Pre Ronde at Port Royal. He and his sons went to the Shepody area and encouraged friends (Blanchards) to settle the Petitcodiac. Three of Thibodeau’s sons first wintered the area in 1699/1700. They did very well at trading furs with Indians. Sebastien de Villieu objected, saying they were on his father-in-law’s seigneurie without permission. Pierre wanted to compromise, but de Villieu didn’t. When de Villieu was ready to deal in 1702, Pierre’s group refused because they had sent a petition to France and thought they’d get their own seigneurie. In 1705, the decision was made that is was only a concession to La Villiere’s seigneurie.
There were 7 families (33 people) at Shepody in 1702, and 5 families (13 people) at Petitcodiac. By 1707, there were about 55 people (14 families and 7 engages), 12 horses, 70 cattle, and 50 sheep. The outbreak of war and de Villieu’s actions put a damper on further settlement of the area. It wasn’t raided, but English ships blocked any goods from coming from Port Royal. Rameau estimated 75 people there in 1715 (but 80% of European blood). One of Thibodeau’s group, his son-in-law Mathieu Des Goutins, was the 2nd and last chief civil officer, or king’s clerk, in Acadia. He became procureur general in 1693, similar (but on a lower level) to Canada’s intendants. He served after Gargas from 1688 to 1710. [Clark, p. 145]
A census was taken in 1698 of Port Royal, Beaubassin, and the St. Jean River areas. The 1698 census includes the names and ages of all family members, as well as a count of livestock, land, and munitions.”

Of special significance is an event happening this Friday, Aug 16th @ 10:30 am in Riverside-Albert with various dignitaries and families representing the Acadian families who settled in Shepody and surrounding area. There will be an official unveiling and address following by Frank McKenna of the Monument that has been erected in honor of the Acadian familiies who settled in the region between 1700 and 1755. You can see the full program for the event at this website.  The event will take place in the park just beside 5702 King St. in Riverside-Albert. Pierre Thibodeau’s great,great,great granddaughter Sonya will also be participating. There will be a social celebration following the ceremony at the exhibition grounds in Riverside-Albert.

This has been a joint effort between the mayor of Riverside-Albert and Wilfred Savoie along with their committees  to have this monument erected. They have been working on it for the past 3 years. Here are the official press releases about the event in French and English.

What a wonderful way to honour some of the founding families who helped clear and settle this great area. You may recognize some of the names like Thibodeau, Boudreau and Comeau or you may even be related to them!  If you want more information about how this event came to be and more details about it , head to their website www.monumentdechipoudie.ca.   We are heading to Newfoundland this week so we won’t be able to attend. I look forward to hearing reports about it. Have a wonderful event! See you on the Road to Waterside or Newfoundland!

For the love of Grindstone

 When I wrote about the new Shorebird Discovery Centre at Mary’s Point and the view of Grindstone Island you can see from the new trail there it reminded me that I hadn’t featured Grindstone Island on the blog yet. The Friends of Grindstone Island is a  group of volunteers that was first started by Kelly-Sue O’Connor in 2015.  I have the great pleasure of introducing Melanie Shaw as our guest this week. She is the current Lead Steward of The Friends of Grindstone Island. With Melanie’s involvement with the Island and her attachment to the area I knew she could do a better feature on it than I could. The first photo is by my husband Mark looking at Grindstone Island from up the hill behind Broadleaf Farm, It gives you an idea of it from far away of where it sits out there in the Bay of Fundy across from the Harvey banks. The rest of the photos are from Melanie from some of her visits to the Island. Read on to hear more about this magical place and how you can be involved in helping to preserve it. There is a special treat at the bottom of the post to enjoy at your leisure. 

 

 

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Clam diggin’

That title is a little deceiving. We didn’t actually go clam digging but we were diggin’ clams. I had a hankering for clam chowder a couple weeks ago and remembered seeing a recipe for it in the Fiddleheads, Fricot and Frittata cookbook compiled by Janet Wallace for the Canada 150 Albert County Museum project. She graciously let me share these 2 recipes with you all. 

This first one is your classic creamy clam chowder. It was so easy and tasty. There is no amount listed for the milk/cream. I made mine a little too thin so add milk/cream slowly until you get the thickness you like for a chowder.

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Outdoor tour- part 1 and 2

Welcome back! It’s actually feeling like summer these past couple of weeks! I hope you are enjoying it wherever you are.  We can’t believe this is our 5th summer enjoying the cottage. It seems like it has taken us a long time to get things finished around the cottage but by budgeting and picking the most important things first, we managed to get 1 or 2 projects done each year outside to help us feel finished. I have shared posts of the rooms and progress in the cottage ( here, here, here and here ). In this post I’m giving part 1 and 2 of our outdoor tour. ( part 3 will come next month- stay tuned! ) If you came and visited the 1st summer, you saw piles of construction debris, old pallets for steps and lots of dirt.  The 2nd summer , 2016, Mark worked on building a shed so we would have some storage for all the things – yes all by himself with a little help from his nephew and father.

We had the lumber delivered from Home Hardware , all the way down to Waterside for $60. Talk about great service! Mark made the trusses himself out of 2×4. He even made the shed doors! I got to paint and stain them of course!

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Mary’s Point 2.0

Exciting news for locals and tourists alike, especially all you bird watchers!  If you were down to Mary’s Point last summer, you would have noticed a new building that was erected beside the old interpretive building. This new Shorebird Discovery Centre is beautifully situated to take in the expanse that is the Shepody Natural Wildlife Area (NWA). The Shepody NWA includes Mary’s Point, New Horton and Germantown Marsh. We were excited to see it and even more excited to hear it would be opening in 2019.  We headed down there this past weekend and was pleased to see one of the interpreter’s we had met last year,  Denis Doucet,  and his team settling in to the centre and getting ready for the grand opening which is happening July 16th at 1 pm.

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Never give up!

Hi folks! Well, it’s been more than a minute since I’ve seen this screen and typed anything more than hello. I almost didn’t remember how to find my blog page but here we are and hopefully back for some more inspirational, creative and adventurous posts.  I had been away from the blog for most of this spring due to my mega studying schedule related to writing an exam to become a Certified Diabetes Educator at the end of May. I am happy and proud to say I got the official paperwork just today and it is official- I PASSED!!!   I can’t believe it!! There were quite a few questions on the exam that I wasn’t sure about but there were many I was sure about so I’m glad the sure ones were the important ones!   Besides the other certification I hold from the American College of Sports Medicine which I got in 2009, this was one of the hardest things I had done that required so much determination and focus and memory- not easy for this old brain. My family and colleagues were a great support and I couldn’t have gotten through this winter and spring without them. I did have to sacrifice being on social media, putting my creative efforts to the side and neglecting a lot of things ( like my house and my weight )  but I am glad I did it. It is something that has been on my goal list for the past 5 years.

I want this to be an encouragement to you that if you have a dream or a goal, sometimes you have to seize the right moment and make it happen because no one else is going to do it for you.You have to believe in yourself and your ability.  I am thankful that even despite my tendency to  see the glass half empty or to think on the negative side at first, I do have a spirit of determination and competitiveness and a fear of failure. I think it is partly my first born nature that gives me the drive to improve, set goals and achieve them but it is also the hope of Christ that keeps me going on days I don’t want to do the hard things. We just keep pressing on toward that mark that God has called us to.

My spirit of determination started at a young age. This little girl and her dad had to have some heart to heart talks when this old body cast came off. This little girl was stubborn and did not want to learn to use her crutches at first. Somehow something sparked and off she went to her first day of school with her crutches, lunch pail and school bag. She hasn’t stopped  dreaming and moving forward since then!

I think that time in my early life really did help me start off with that sense of accomplishment and success that would help me throughout my life when other challenges came along. I remember the time when I started swimming lessons soon after this and didn’t pass the 1st level-  I didn’t give up and ended up teaching swimming lessons throughout high school and university. It took me at least 2 times to pass my National LIfeguard exam but I eventually got it and ended up working at Magic Mountain and Fundy Park. Thankfully the only person I ever had to rescue was my nephew in a river in New Hampshire a few years ago.

My other big accomplishment I felt the most proud of was getting in to physio school. Back in 1991 when I applied, you only needed 1 year of a Science degree to apply but you had to have good marks and they only took I think 18 students from New Brunswick. When I heard other students losing their scholarships in the 1st year of unversity which I had not been successful at earning , I was determined to get in to physio school and I did ( even while dating my new boyfriend who became my husband- he was a good motivator 🙂 ) .

Doing this exam and and having other milestones happen this spring- like 25 years of service at the hospital and 25 years of marriage, has just made me reflect on all that a person can accomplish in a lifetime when they are consistent and work hard with the Lord’s help and guidance along the way as well.  Here’s to many more milestones ahead with dreams and goals to pursue. I say it to my patients and I encourage us all to never give up!! You never know what you can accomplish. I hope you’ll stick around this summer as we get more posts  up and going to inspire you to dream and create as well.

Love,

Sheila

Easter creations

Hello and Happy Spring! It feels strange to be opening up this blog and writing again. I have been focused on the books for the past few weeks and have missed sharing with all of you. My study time is nearing the end – only a few weeks to go. Whether I pass or not at least I have learned a lot!  I did take a few hours this past week to work on a few Easter creations. You know by now that I love to decorate for the seasons and holidays so this was a good distraction.

When I picked up a couple wooden bunnies at the Habitat Restore for Farm Fresh Style’s thrifting challenge a few weeks ago, I knew I wanted to create some bunny themed items for Easter. I also had this cute little child’s rocking chair my dear friend wanted me to paint so I thought they would go well together. 

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Contentment and creativity

It is a pleasure to welcome my insightful, smart, and talented husband back to the blog as a guest contributor today. Please make him feel welcome and enjoy his thoughts on creativity and being ok with just doing things for yourself but also being willing to share it with the world as well.

Hi, recently my amazing wife Sheila celebrated her first anniversary of sharing with you this blog, ‘The Road to Waterside’.  It is her musings, interests, and her creativity inspired by the region we live in with a focus on the areas surrounding Waterside, New Brunswick.  Hopefully, you all have a ‘Road to Waterside’. That place where your heart both beats faster and rests more easily. A place where you gravitate to, at least in your mind.  Both Sheila and I draw inspiration from our such place, and I expect you do too when you visit yours. Sheila has shared many projects resulting from her inspiration this week I am sharing some thoughts on creativity and inspiration. This is certainly a different kind of post.  But I hope you can draw some things from it that will help you with your creativeness.

Day at the beach

I like the feelings and childhood memories it evokes of visits to the Fundy shore.  I like how the car looks old and how the image is de-saturated. But I’ve never shared this image because it seemed too busy.  It is not singular enough to be as strong as it could have been.

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